CIRS Blog about Rural California

By Hannah Guzik

If Washington, D.C. legislators approve cuts to government health care, California’s rural counties are among those who will suffer most, according to a new report.

Those who live in the state’s rural counties—which are largely in Northern California—are more likely than urban residents to be enrolled in the low-income health program called Medi-Cal, according to the report released June 6th from the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families and North Carolina Rural Health Research Program.

Medi-Cal covers 28 percent of adults and 54 percent of children in California’s rural counties, researchers found. Meanwhile, in the state’s metro areas, 21 percent of adults and 44 percent of children are enrolled in the health program.

Before the federal Affordable Care Act and state reforms opened the gates of Medi-Cal to most low-income adults and children, a quarter of the state’s rural residents under age 65 were uninsured. But by mid-2015, that uninsured rate had fallen to 11 percent.

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By Hannah Guzik

Amidst anxiety about potential federal funding cuts to health programs, California has one bright spot. The state’s new tobacco tax is expected to generate about $1.2 billion next fiscal year for the state’s low-income health program.

Now, California legislators and Gov. Jerry Brown are battling over how to spend the money.

Immigrant rights’ advocates are asking the state to use a portion of the Proposition 56 funding to expand health coverage to undocumented young adults.

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By Lisa Renner

For Steve, a senior in rural Stanislaus County, problem-solving therapy helped him conquer mild depression.

“The first step in improving is finding the problems,” said the 63-year-old Oakdale resident, who requested that his last name not be used because he doesn’t want to be stigmatized for having depression. “Once you find and define them, then you can work on how to overcome them.”

Steve is one of about 80 seniors who have participated in a study to determine the effectiveness of problem-solving therapy in reducing depression in rural seniors who live in the Central California counties of Stanislaus, Tuolumne and Calaveras.

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BY MICHAEL DOYLE AND SEAN COCKERHAM

 

WASHINGTON —California loses big time in President Donald Trump’s proposed fiscal 2018 budget, made public to scathing political reviews Tuesday.

Some Central Valley farm spending would fall. Nutrition programs would shrink. Certain school grants would be handcuffed, University of California research would be curtailed and reimbursements ended for the state’s incarceration of law-breaking unauthorized immigrants. 

While slashing social safety nets, Trump wants a 10 percent increase in military spending and $1.6 billion in funding for a wall on the border with Mexico – a small amount for a massive project estimated to cost between $22 billion and nearly $70 billion to construct.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Bakersfield, defended the plans. “The White House has produced a strong, conservative budget,” he said. “While I continue to review the details, it’s obvious that the White House sticks to what is right by prioritizing defense and balancing the budget in 10 years.”

Deemed dead on arrival by congressional Democrats, Trump’s $4.1 trillion budget proposal for the new year that starts Oct. 1 disheartened some Republican lawmakers, as well. Everyone agrees it’s only a starting point for negotiations, albeit one with particular consequences for the state that Trump lost by 4.3 million votes last November.

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By Lisa Renner 

Richmond resident Jervice Youngblood is grateful that she receives government-subsidized child care for her 2-year-old daughter while she works as a transit driver.

“I do not have too many family members I can depend on to watch my daughter,” she said. Without the subsidy, “I wouldn’t be able to go to work and make money and it would be hard to pay my bills.”

Youngblood is among the few qualifying low-income parents who use child-care subsidies for children 2 and younger. According to a report released in March by policy group Children Nowonly 9 percent of eligible infants and toddlers have state-subsidized child care.

Eligibility for these subsidies is based on state income eligibility guidelines, set at 70 percent of the state median income — or $46,896 for a family of four, said Stacy Lee, managing director of early childhood project integration for Children Now.

Those who work in the child-care field say the chief reasons the subsidies are underused are a severe shortage of child-care spots for that age group, insufficient hours offered by day care providers and reluctance on the part of parents to leave children that young in day care.

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