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By Ron Shinkman

Amidst great uncertainty about federal health policy, Covered California announced Tuesday that insurance premiums on the state-run exchange will rise on average 12.5 percent next year, an increase that is slightly lower than in 2017. The agency reiterated that it has a containment plan should the Trump administration cease to provide cost-sharing subsidies for lower-income exchange enrollees.

All 11 insurers currently offering coverage on the state’ exchange will return in 2018, although Anthem Blue Cross will withdraw from Southern California.

The premium hike for 2018 is down from the 13.2 percent average increase for this year, but still much higher than the low single-digit rate hikes announced for 2015 and 2016.

Covered California Executive Director Peter V. Lee noted that if consumers shop around for different plans in each tier of coverage, they could keep their rate increases down to 3.3 percent.

“For consumers, no increase is a good increase, but Covered California did a good job in these uncertain times,” said Betsy Imholz, director of special projects for Consumers Union in San Francisco.

Imholz credited the exchange for taking a tough negotiating stance with the health insurers and ensuring that competition remains in place in most of the state. According to Lee, 82 percent of Covered California’s enrollees will have three or more health plans to choose from.    

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in Rural Health 142 0
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BY MICHAEL DOYLE AND SEAN COCKERHAM

 

WASHINGTON —California loses big time in President Donald Trump’s proposed fiscal 2018 budget, made public to scathing political reviews Tuesday.

Some Central Valley farm spending would fall. Nutrition programs would shrink. Certain school grants would be handcuffed, University of California research would be curtailed and reimbursements ended for the state’s incarceration of law-breaking unauthorized immigrants. 

While slashing social safety nets, Trump wants a 10 percent increase in military spending and $1.6 billion in funding for a wall on the border with Mexico – a small amount for a massive project estimated to cost between $22 billion and nearly $70 billion to construct.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Bakersfield, defended the plans. “The White House has produced a strong, conservative budget,” he said. “While I continue to review the details, it’s obvious that the White House sticks to what is right by prioritizing defense and balancing the budget in 10 years.”

Deemed dead on arrival by congressional Democrats, Trump’s $4.1 trillion budget proposal for the new year that starts Oct. 1 disheartened some Republican lawmakers, as well. Everyone agrees it’s only a starting point for negotiations, albeit one with particular consequences for the state that Trump lost by 4.3 million votes last November.

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in Rural California 243 0
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BY SEAN COCKERHAM AND MICHAEL DOYLE

WASHINGTON — California Republicans representing some of the nation’s most Obamacare-dependent areas in America took a giant political risk on Thursday by voting to repeal the landmark health care law, as they believed their political danger was eased as they got something to brag about back home.

They said they were convinced for much the same reason as so many other undecided Republicans who helped give GOP leaders the health care win they had so desperately sought: The addition of $8 billion to the bill to help with insurance costs for people with pre-existing conditions.

The congressmen dismissed estimates that the money isn’t nearly enough: an analysis by the liberal Center for American Progress said it would subsidize care for only 76,000 people out of millions.

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in Rural Health 284 0
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WASHINGTON — The lead author in the House of Representatives of a big and controversial California water bill that passed last year is back for more.

With a Republican in the White House and the GOP controlling Congress, Rep. David Valadao, R-Calif., said Tuesday that he was hoping to build on last year’s legislation that was loved by farmers and loathed by environmentalists. 

The bill scales back an ambitious San Joaquin River restoration program, speeds completion of California dam feasibility studies and locks in certain water deliveries to Sacramento Valley irrigation districts, among other things. Parts of the bill would not have been accepted by the Obama administration, but the Trump team is different.

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in Water 276 0
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WASHINGTON —California Republican Rep. David Valadao of Hanford is pushing for an immigration overhaul, placing himself in the middle of the very issue that’s ripping both parties apart. 

Through public statements, legislation and now an earnestly worded plea to President Donald Trump, Valadao has positioned himself as one of the few congressional Republicans daring to support a comprehensive package that includes a pathway to legal status for immigrants who are already in this country illegally.

“For too long, extremes on either side of the aisle have discouraged constructive discussion regarding immigration,” Valadao said in the two-page letter sent to Trump on Tuesday, “but I believe with new executive leadership, now is the time to enact meaningful reform.”

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