Research

Research

 

Program, policy, and funding decisions require access to accurate information to identify priorities and allocate resources in the most optimal manner. CIRS conducts research for planning, needs assessments and other forms of primary and secondary data analysis that help organizations identify priorities, with respect to services, geographic coverage and target populations. Our research supports a broad range of organizations, including public sector agencies that need to develop or refine health programs; funders interested in developing funding guidelines or initiatives based on priority community needs and interests; and non-profits requiring additional data on their target populations for grant proposals or programming purposes.

 

Past Clients:

  • The California Endowment: Conducted The California Agricultural Workers Health Survey, the largest farmworker health survey in California history.
  • James Irvine Foundation, Central Valley Partnership (CVP): Technical assistance for CVP and Civic Action Network members working to increase immigrant civic participation in the Central Valley.
  • Napa County: An assessment of the demand for farmworker housing in Napa County, including recommendations for improvements.
  • California Health Care Foundation and Mendocino County Children’s Health Initiative: CIRS conducted research on enrollment and retention patterns among Healthy Families beneficiaries, to better understand reasons behind low retention rates.
  • USDA Agricultural Marketing Service: Breaking down market barriers for small and mid-sized organic growers identified marketing challenges limiting the viability of small and mid-sized farms.
  • Fresno Healthy Dairy Commission: Impacts of the dairy sector on air quality in Fresno County and mechanisms to reduce emissions.
  • Mendocino County: Assessment for the demand of farmworker housing and transportation in Mendocino County with recommendations for addressing needs.

 

 


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